Introducing the "Aster Collar" + Tips and Tricks

Updated: Jan 10

The Aster collar is my first published sewing pattern, which is available for FREE! I had the idea for this pattern from all of the vintage 1930s and 40s sewing patterns that I admire on pinterest. Blouses and dresses had such interesting collar designs at that time.





This pattern is great, because it allows you to add vintage flair to a simple t shirt or un-collared shirt. It is perfect for those who are interested in starting to dress vintage (like myself), as it is a quick and simple handmade project that can be added to modern clothing. I hope to create some other designs so that you can mix and match different collars to different tops, and get many different looks!


This pattern is suitable for light to mid weight fabrics that hold their shape well, such as most cottons (quilting, lawn, shirting), linen, wool. This makes it a great project for beginner sewists as many like to start with quilting cottons, which is a great because they are so nice to sew! Plus they come in so many neat prints! I also like this pattern as it is a great scrap buster, so you can use up small left over pieces from previous sewing projects, or to up-cycle old clothing!


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The first tip for sewing this pattern is to tack the folds together so they don't flop around and open up. To do this you can hand sew a few stitches to the inside of the pleats near each edge.




Another great tip is to make your own covered buttons - without a covered button kit! It is actually super easy, and it is a perfect way to use up old ugly buttons! I learned this idea from a youtube video by Constance MacKenzie who is a wonderful English gal who loves historical dress! In her video she makes covered buttons using pennies, or coins, or plastic molds. But I thought why not make a covered button out of a plain button! And it works great!





To do you will first take a simple button, scrap fabric, a pencil or fabric pen and something to trace around to make a circle.




I cut out the circle using pinking shears to prevent fraying, and I also added a couple of smaller circles of fabric to add a bit of cushion and give the button a softer rounder look. you could always use cotton batting or something which would also work well.





Hand sew large basting stitches near the outer edge.








Start to gently pull on the thread to gather the ends together.









once pulled tightly together secure by stitching through the middle of the fabric a few times - or until it feels secure.









Secure your new covered button to your collar!










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